Marketing these days is a tough gig. The average person is so overly bombarded with marketing messages, offers, and options that they simply tune out a large percentage of what they see online. If you can’t capture your digital audience’s attention in less than 8 seconds…POOF, they’re gone. Some poor inbound marketer out there is currently mortified at the sight of their website’s high bounce rate or zero page views for the matter.

Customer-Journey-Meme

Let’s just keep it one hunnid (aka one hundred, aka keep it real). Consumers’ attention spans will continue to wane and the amount of online content available to them will continue to grow at an exponential level. To top it off, we’re dealing with a demographic nearly one-fourth of the total population. Yes, we’re talking about the new boom, le Millennials. We know you’re probably sick and tired of hearing this term, but nearly every marketer today is making Generation Y a priority. And if you don’t know by now why, it’s because you can’t ignore a lucrative market some 80 million strong with $200 billion in annual buying power. Plain and simple.

We’re so sexy powerful and we know it. Yes, I’m one of them – scouring websites, blogs, and social media because I feel empowered by all of the remarkable or amusing content I’m discovering. And I’m liking, commenting, pinning, sharing, snapping, group messaging, and forwarding all of my findings to my peers. But only if it resonates with me.

Which brings me to the point of this blog post. If you want to attract this audience, you have to be more relevant than ever. That in itself is a hard pill to swallow given the aforementioned statistics and information. One way to stay cool in a post-modern world of choice dominated by Millennials is to speak their language. You have the potential to raise Gen Y’ers spirits when they hear or read words that could have come from the mouths of their peers. When you tailor your messaging to your audience, they will proudly share that content with others, in effect, building a real brand-consumer relationship.

But before I divulge into the slang terms to keep in your toolbox when competing for Millennial mind share, take precaution of the following two:

  1. Authenticity is still key to brand survival over generations. In order to sound bona fide, the message you’re sending out has to be relevant with your brand (vegetarians don’t want steak, bih). Brands who jump on trends just because they’re trending are asking for a backlash. Certain brands or types of products are just not going to be cool because it’s not built into the fabric of their company. We can honestly smell marketing construction from a mile away. Take for example the Twitter account Brands Saying Bae, who exposes all the brands that try to put a “hip” spin on communication and it doesn’t mesh with their core brand identity. Right now, Internet, we implore you…bae meme
  2. “Don’t show up to the party late af.” Thanks to social and mobile innovations, whatever is currently trending has a short life cycle. Now, “cool” travels way faster. Something trending can hit a saturation point and fizzle out within days, even hours. The goal is not to be a laggard, where you turn something cool into something nauseating (refer back to bae) because it’s already been mass consumed. Instead, be an early adopter of what’s in. A good example of this? The cool hunters at Taco Bell HQ’s. The fast-food chain has this weekly routine called “Millennial Word of The Day” that the marketing department employs. Words are “curated” by a group of employees in their 20s who send out an email every Tuesday or Wednesday of the real current Millennial lingo. Then they turn it into content that people engage the crap out of. Major key alert (I’ll explain what this means below): Be like Taco Bell, try out a social media platform they way your fans would.

Alright, let me put you on (this means I want to make you aware of something or someone new) with the trendy terminology:

Bih – This word is similar to saying dude or homie and it can also be used to pronounce a place. In its derogatory form, it’s also an abbreviation for b***h. If you follow rapper Plies on Instagram, you’ll quickly realize this is his favorite word, aptly naming his latest mixtape, “This Ain’t No Mixtape Bih”.

Use it in a sentence:

I can’t wait to go to the club on Saturday, I’m gonna be dancing all over that bih.

Waddup bih, long time no see.

Bruh – Another way of greeting a male acquaintance or an alternative to the word bro. It is also used during a stupid moment or as a reaction to something crazy – like saying seriously or really.

Use it in a sentence:

Chill out bruh.

OR

Person 1: I just dropped all the popcorn on the floor.

Person 2: bruh.

Dab – This is actually a dance created that looks like you’re kissing your biceps and it’s dominating the Internet. Everyone is doing it, even Hilary Clinton (it was actually pretty painful to watch). Obama fix it.

Tread lightly when you use this word, though. Dabbin’ can also mean the act of smoking highly-concentrated THC oils.

Dat ___, doe – Translates to “That ___, though,” and is used to emphasize that something is particularly awesome.

Use it in a sentence:

Dat backflip doe.

Forever Alone – this simply means you will be single for eternity (kind of like the lady that has no real friends, but has 50 cats as companions).

Use it in a sentence:

“So I finally gathered the courage to text him and he never replied. Forever alone.”

Lit – this is a word is an adjective “used to describe a certain situation, person, place or thing as awesome/crazy or just ‘happening’ in general.

Use it in a sentence:

Friend 1: Did you go to that party last night?

Friend 2: yea, it was lit!

tzqzi

Throwing shade – To “throw shade” simply means you’ve said something shady to someone. Watch Dorian Corey explain it in “Paris is Burning”.

Turnt – Used when an individual is super excited, hyper, or intoxicated.

Use it in a sentence:

“I’m so turnt for the new season of Keeping Up With The Kardashians.”

OR

“I’m so hungover, I got too turnt last night.”

And if you don’t know, now you know, bruh.

 

This article was written by Katie Cooper from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.