What Are Brand Ambassadors and Why Are They Important?

Over the past few years, methods for reaching a target audience have changed significantly. While marketers probably prefer a time when TV commercials were most effective, the majority of people are getting used to new channels of promotion.

What was once considered cutting-edge, no longer works. The days of one direction communication are over. What’s the latest trend in marketing communications? Brand Ambassadors.

And by saying Brand Ambassadors, we are not necessarily thinking of big names. Okay, celebrities are Brand Ambassadors as well, but we want to focus on individuals who aren’t Oscar-winning actors but can still have a significant impact on a brand’s image. Let’s start from the beginning. People trust Brand Ambassadors. Companies (should) love them.

Who Is a Brand Ambassador?

There are two types of Brand Ambassadors (aka Brand Advocates). The first are famous and recognizable people; companies hire them, the relationship is transparently transactional, and expectations are straightforward.

Such cooperation is planned step by step, strictly scheduled, and forecasted. In that case, a brand ambassador is a very well-known individual to the public or particular industries.

Nowadays, brands focus on bloggers and personalities on social media (YouTubers and Instagrammers). These YouTubers and Instagrammers often achieve similar campaign marketing results as the “big names.” They open their engaged community to brand partners and offer space on their blogs, YT, and social media channels.

The second type of Brand Ambassadors are people who mention or recommend your brand freely. Sure, big names can do the job, but not in the same way; the most significant difference between these types of Brand Ambassadors and the first category is that they often advocate for free (or at least on a non-cash exchange basis).

These are diehard fans. They tend to get satisfaction from being engaged with the brand. Expectations in a long-term relationship with this type of Brand Ambassador includes branded freebies from the company or concierge-level customer service.

There are many ways to turn a regular (but vocal) customer into a Brand Ambassador. In return, he may become loyal (and write about you once or twice) or extremely loyal (and then they can call you their hero!). Their love for and knowledge about your brand can catapult them into micro influencer status. So, is this type of micro influencer significant? Let’s take a closer look.

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Why Are Brand Ambassadors So Important?

Let’s go back to the beginning of this article for a moment. Brand promotion and image building can now be both the hardest and simplest it has ever been.

How is that possible? Here’s the answer. The most difficult thing to overcome in TV advertising is that it became boring and predictable to the viewer. TV viewers most often react to commercials by changing the channel as soon as they hear a commercial break coming. The result is time, money, and resources wasted.

What is more, brands that present only positively present themselves aren’t trusted (but it is unlikely they would say negative things about their brand in paid ads).

According to the survey below, recommendations, at 78%, is the best type of brand advertisement. Herein lies the power of the Brand Ambassador.

If the audience knows that a person promoting the brand is not being paid to do so, they will more likely believe them. This type of word-of-mouth marketing works great. But remember, acquisition of loyal Brand Ambassadors can be difficult. It is to some “a reward” for a magnificent and hard job.

Brand Ambassadors

Now take a look at the “simplest part” of building an image. We live at a time when the Internet is creating tremendous opportunities for marketers.

We can make noise with our marketing toolbox and (with luck) will hit the nail on the head. With a small budget, we can reach thousands of people and show them how cool we are. We have websites, social media fan pages, and profiles, where they can go to check us out and interact with us.

We don’t need tons of gold to be shown in a good light. Also, out there in the virtual world, our Brand Ambassadors live and express their opinions and impressions of us—giving us credit, expressing satisfaction and gratitude, encouraging others to try or benefit from using our product X.

They have immense credibility as the perception is that their opinions are objective. People have every reason to believe the sincere testimonials from these Brand Ambassadors. Especially, if they’re the first (objective) opinion on the brand that people see when googling.

Brand Ambassadors not only make people eager to try new products, but they also build an image of your brand in micro-or-macro (if a Brand Ambassador is an influencer – lucky you!) scale. How likely is it that an audience would believe a producer’s advertisement and not a regular person who recommends it without prompting?

How to Find and Deal with Brand Ambassadors

When asked, people tend to prefer recommendations that come through IRL conversations in person or over the phone. Although, as noted, Brand Ambassadors are most active on the web. You can find them on forums, on Twitter, in posts, articles, blogs, and comments.

There are available tools to help you find people who mention your brand on social media. Using a social media monitoring tool will automatically gather your chosen keywords’ data and brand mentions, usually compiled in easy to digest graphs. Want to be up-to-date with all your brand mentions? It’s never been easier.

Anytime anybody types something about your brand, product or service, your media intelligence tool will let you know. Also, it can surface interactive mentions from the most influential so that you can engage with them.

Brand Ambassadors

Okay, so what can we do when we find an engaged user who chooses to recommend us? Thank them and thank them fast. In this instance, getting there first is important. You get extra points for two things: reacting swiftly and appreciating the efforts. By showing your interest, you communicate that you are aware of what your audience says about you and that the feedback is appreciated.

Showing your interest in engaging with your audience is the first step. The next step is up to you. Depending on the size and type of recommendation you have a full choice of what to do further. Send vocal customers a gift. It doesn’t have to be a new car. A funny cup, a set of office tools, a free monthly access to an account in your application, a calendar.

Remember, whatever it is – it must be high quality and relevant to your brand. Have a lot of Brand Ambassadors? That’s great! You don’t have to be Santa Claus. Mention them on your social media accounts, leave a ‘thank you, Ann!’ below the comment. You need to estimate the scale and nurture them as you feel. And you should always take your Brand Ambassadors seriously.

Summary

Nowadays, Brand Ambassadors mean the world to brands. As brands earmark thousands of dollars for campaigns, agencies, and space/time, fans who recommend them for free are a treasure trove of gold.

Fortunately, they are more affordable than a pot of gold. It is necessary to keep an eye on Brand Ambassadors, be thankful, appreciative, stay in touch, ask what they expect of your brand, and never underestimate their power.

Neglecting them is a sin against your brand reputation. Be as good as good to your audience as they believe you are.

When you’re ready to engage with Brand Ambassadors and welcome into the fold as your Influencers, make sure the parameters of the relationship are spelled out for everyone’s benefit. Download our ebook, The Communication Pro’s Guide to Influencer Marketing.

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This post previously appeared on this site on July 29, 2016. We repost articles on Saturdays that our readers might have missed the first time around.

This article originally appeared in The Positionly SEO and Inbound Marketing Blog, was written by Magdalena Urbaniak from Business2Community, and legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Instagram Marketing: The Sky’s the Limit

The Goldmine That Is Instagram Marketing

Instagram marketing is becoming increasingly important for many brands, especially those in highly visual industries, such as retailers, restaurants, entertainment, and travel companies. The channel has seen explosive growth since it first appeared on the scene in 2010. New figures published by The Guardian show the photo-sharing platform’s monthly active user base has more than doubled in size over the past two years, with 500 million people a month worldwide now using Instagram.

Here is a quick look at why Instagram marketing matters, how companies can increase engagement across the platform, and how they can measure their successes.

So, Why Instagram?

Simply put, plain text is on its way out. Audiences want to experience visual engagement through pictures and videos that take no time to digest.

Instagram revealed that the app has more than 400 million monthly users, 80 million daily photos, 3.5 billion daily likes, and lots of opportunity to marketers. Forrester named Instagram the “King of Social Engagement,” citing that top brands’ Instagram posts generated a per-follower engagement rate of 4.2 percent—58 times more engagement per follower than Facebook, and 120 times more engagement per follower than Twitter. Instagram marketing is powerful as it allows our audience to visually consume ideas and make decisions about our brand without us being too pushy.

So how can we generate (and measure) ROI from Instagram marketing engagement?

Step 1: Content First

First, we need to share interesting content that resonates with our audience.

Bahamas Ministry of Tourism is a Meltwater client with a savvy Instagram marketing strategy. They used a stunning image of dolphins to demonstrate why they were named the #1 destination to encounter big animals while scuba diving. Rather than taking a picture of their award, they creatively snapped the dolphins “celebrating.”

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Whilst it’s great to showcase company successes, Social Media Today suggests marketers apply the 20/80 rule. 20% of posts should promote our products directly; the remaining 80% should promote our brand lifestyle. Schedule a healthy mix of posts that relate back to your brand with outside content that  is relevant to your audience. While Instagram consists of photo and video cotext-based images such as memes and quotes are a great way to bring a brand voice to life. Take a look at Fit Tea’s Insta account, the herbal tea company has many famous affiliates helping to promote its message, including the Kardashian clan. Even Ryan Gosling is also on hand to lend some encouragement!

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Instagram marketing can strengthen brand identity by offering a behind-the-scenes peek into the culture and lifestyle that surround our brand. Showcasing employees is an easy way to add a personal edge to Instagram marketing and aid recruiting. Take a look at Meltwater’s Instagram account. We love sharing pics from special events along with office snapshots of #MeltwaterLife.

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Aim to get customers involved and ask them to show off photos of themselves interacting with the brand or using our product. Consumers trust their peers more than brands themselves. A social media post demonstrating the value of a product is worth more than any ad. Coco White Tooth Whitening Oil leverages user-generated content, such as this photo testimonial, to prove worth without talking about themselves directly, Never underestimate the power of a double tap!
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Step 2: Wise Words

Use captions wisely. If Instagram is all about a company’s identity, then the caption adds context to the visual. Don’t state the obvious; share the story behind the picture. Remember that people only read the caption once the image has their attention.

Hashtags are essential as they make your post discoverable, as does location tagging! While Instagram allows for up to 30 tags, common consensus recommends 1-5 tags per post so we don’t #spam. If you must add more, write them in the comments so they are searchable but stay hidden after more people start commenting. Keep in mind that Instagram currently does not allow links in captions, only one link in your profile . However, this is changing with the arrival of Instagram business accounts.

Step 3: Be Exclusive

Post exclusive discounts or content on Instagram to give potential fans an incentive for visiting your page. Deals or contests are a tangible way to drive traffic and increase engagement while solidifying your following. Reap the benefit of having a network of people talking about them on their personal pages by encouraging users to share photos with your hashtag.

I’ve Increased Engagement.. Now What?

There’s no way to know if you have increased engagement without monitoring Instagram marketing efforts. Engagement analytics help marketers understand which types of posts our audience likes most, so we can can better focus our strategy. Not one to be left behind, Meltwater launched Instagram media monitoring this year, allowing customers to monitor mentions and keep track of engagement in real time.

In conclusion, remember that Instagram marketing is all about creating a company’s visual identity. Be true to the brand and promote the lifestyle. Engagement will follow.

Sidekick 8/14-8/20

This week is the bee’s knees! From World Honeybee Day to Soft Serve Ice Cream Day to Lemon Meringue Day, the middle of August is looking pretty sweet. However, it’s not all fun and games. Learn more about important issues such as National Immunization Awareness Month and get your content calendar done two weeks in advance with the help of Social Sidekick.  For an even further peek into the future, sign up to receive this straight to your inbox each week

Celebrate the Month of August

//HEALTH//
National Immunization Awareness Month

//FOOD//
Peach Month, Panini Month, Sandwich Month, Catfish Month

//FUN//
Romance Awareness Month

Sunday, August 14

//HOLIDAYS//
Creamsicle Day, Social Security Day

//HASHTAGS//
#SundayFunday, #SelfieSunday, #Sinday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Steve Martin, Mila Kunis, Halle Berry, Tim Tebow. Magic Johnson

//TV PREMIERES//
Chesapeake Shores (9 PM, Hallmark)

Monday, August 15

//HOLIDAYS//
Best Friends Day, Relaxation Day, Lemon Meringue Pie Day

//HASHTAGS//
#ManCrushMonday or #MCM, #MondayBlues, #MotivationMonday, #MarketingMonday, #MeatlessMonday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Julia Child, Jennifer Lawrence, Joe Jonas, Ben Affleck, Debra Messing

//TV PREMIERES//
Lost City of Gladiators (9 PM, Smithsonian)

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Tuesday, August 16

//HOLIDAYS//
Airborne Day, Bratwurst Day, Roller Coaster Day

//HASHTAGS//
#TransformationTuesday or #TT, #TravelTuesday, #ToungeOutTuesday, #Tunesday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Madonna, Steve Carell, James Cameron, Kathie Lee Gifford, Cristin Milioti

//TV PREMIERES//
Andrew Zimmern’s Driven By Food (9 PM, Travel)

Wednesday, August 17

//HOLIDAYS//
Vanilla Custard Day, Thrift Shop Day, Black Cat Appreciation Day

//HASHTAGS//
#WomanCrushWednesday or #WCW, #WayBackWednesday or #WBW, #WineWednesday, #WellnessWednesday, #HumpDay, #WisdomWednesday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Robert De Niro, Donnie Wahlberg, Larry Ellison Giuliana Rancic, Davy Crockett, Mae West

//TV PREMIERES//
My Last Days (9 PM, The CW), Unlocking the Truth (11 PM, MTV)

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Thursday, August 18
Bad Poetry Day, Mail Order Catalog Day

//HOLIDAYS//
Soft Serve Ice Cream Day

//HASHTAGS//
#TBT or #ThrowbackThursday, #Thursdate, #ThoughtfulThursday, #ThirstyThursday, #ThankfulThursday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Andy Samberg, Patrick Swayze, Edward Norton, Robert Redford, Christian Slater, Madeline Stowe, Roman Polanski

//ALBUM RELEASES//
Blood Orange, “Baytown Sound”; Dolly Parton, “Pure & Simple”; Kifer Sutherland, “Down a Hole”; Lydia Loveless, “Real”

Friday, August 19

//HOLIDAYS//
World Humanitarian Day, Photography Day, Men’s Grooming Day, Aviation Day, Potato Day, Hot & Spicy Food Day

//HASHTAGS//
#FollowFriday or #FF, #FlashbackFriday or #FBF, #FridayFeeling, #FriYay, #FridayReads

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Bill Clinton, John Stamos, Matthew Perry, Coco Chanel, Orville Wright, Kyra Sedgwick

//MOVIE RELEASES//
Ben Hur, War Dogs, Kubo and the Two Strings

//TV RELEASES//
Superstore (10:30 PM, NBC)

Saturday, August 20

//HOLIDAYS//
World Honey Bee Day, Lemonade Day, Chocolate Pecan Pie Day  

//HASHTAGS//
#Caturday, #SexySaturday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Demi Lovato, Amy Adams, Andrew Garfield, Al Roker

 

Getting It Right: Best Practices for Brands Giving Apologies

Forever burned in my memory is a certain sign about apologies that hung on the wall at my first fast-food job. It read:

Proper apologies have three parts:

1) What I did was wrong. 2) I feel badly that I hurt you. 3) How can I make this better?

The adage isn’t particularly mind-blowing, so I’m not sure why it stuck so securely in my memory. Maybe for the simple fact that one spends a lot of time at fast-food jobs staring at the wall. But it does address three important aspects of apologies – sincerity, simplicity, and thoroughness. When someone has been wronged (or even if they just believe that they have been), they want the response to have all three of those elements.

But as a brand, apologies can be tricky.

Many people see companies – especially large ones – as cold, impersonal monoliths, only noteworthy when they’ve erred. So when those inevitable errors do occur, crafting an apology that returns some public goodwill can be difficult.

Whether or not this is accomplished is, of course, dependent on many factors – first and foremost being the infraction committed. If the crime is egregious enough, conversations about crafting the right apology are irrelevant and silly. For example, it’d be absurd to imagine Bernie Madoff worrying about recapturing his public image from behind bars – it’s too far past that point.

But in most cases, companies who’ve fallen from grace do have incentive to stay in the PR trenches, so to speak, and fight for that goodwill. When this happens, the first step is that famed brand apology. It’s a tactic that’s so well-tread that at this point it’s cliché.

Beyond that lie many factors more specific to the brand itself. For example, what is the history of its corporate social responsibility measures?

The traditional notion is that brands apologizing for a first-time offense are given a bit more understanding than repeat offenders. This makes sense, but it’s becoming increasingly difficult to fit brands into neat categories such as those.

Tone

Maintaining the right tone is important for more than just apologizing, but it can be of particular importance in those situations. It’s best defined as the “taste” left in the “mouth” of your audience. It is a deciding factor in whether your apology elicits an emotional response or falls flat.

For a long time, brands were afraid to show personality in all aspects of their branding. The bigger the business, the less likely there would be any personal touch to corporate communications. Eventually, that ideology was left in the dust; too many companies realized the importance of creating genuine engagement with a strategically targeted audience.

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When apologizing for a misstep, brands have to walk a fine line between individualism and aloofness. If a company has spent considerable time building a fun-loving brand, it can be difficult and jarring for it to immediately pivot into the grave, conciliatory tone that a good apology often requires.

Another fine line for brands to walk is the one between combativeness and weakness. What if a brand is publicly criticized for something that’s genuinely not true? It can be tough to know when to defend against the allegations and when to immediately start seeking public reappraisal and forgiveness. Typically, PR experts err towards the more cautious latter route, wanting to avoid giving off a hostile or unpleasant image.

One famous counterexample occurred earlier this year when Amazon was forced to contend with a scathing exposé by The New York Times of its “toxic workplace culture and unfair expectations placed on employees.”

After initially taking a more traditional route ‒ a mildly defensive press release and a series of bewildered “This isn’t the Amazon I know” tweets from CEO Jeff Bezos ‒ the company took a boldly aggressive next step. Jay Carney, the head of PR and former White House press secretary, wrote an intense, attack-filled blog post that questioned the character of both the journalists who wrote the article and the ex-Amazonians who were profiled.

While the tone wasn’t typical of a major brand digging itself out of a PR crisis, many experts actually cited the post as a positive thing; an example of how important it is to fight for your brand, especially when you feel the truth is on your side.

Timing

When brands apologize, there can be a temptation to get the press release out as quickly as possible. This makes sense because the news cycle only has so much room for one brand or story, so it’s possible to wait too long and find that the public has already moved on. In those cases, it may be too late to recoup any of the lost brand strength.

But there’s also something to be said for letting the dust settle before starting the brand apology process. When the media first gets its hands on a story, certain outlets will inevitably make some errors in judgement and publish information that hasn’t been thoroughly fact-checked. For many brands, it’s a good idea to wait for some of that kind of reporting to finish before delivering a well-researched, fact-based apology.

For one thing, the company will appear more measured and less reactionary, a far more appealing look in the eyes of the public. Also, these situations can often result in legal proceedings. If a company is facing risk of legal action, it’s wise to consult with counsel before delivering any kind of apology that could potentially be used against it in a court of law.

Format

Just as technology has drastically changed the way brands market themselves, it’s also transformed how they handle their inevitable public relations crises. The days of simply sending out a press release and “waiting out the storm” are long gone. Companies reach their audiences on many different channels now, so it’s important to use some combination of strategies that will get your apology heard by as much of that audience as possible.

Social channels like Facebook and Twitter (more on this specifically in a bit) allow brands to appear more human because they are the places where humans actually interact with one another.

Action

Part of the problem with generic, cookie-cutter apology formats is that they don’t leave room for specifics. When a brand has been publicly shamed, the most important part of the next step is to demonstrate to the public that there are legitimate actions being taken to improve. It’s a tired but true cliché: actions speak louder than words.

A good example of this from 2015 was Apple’s swift response to criticism for their decision to not pay artists for songs streamed on Apple Music during customers’ free three month trial. Of course, that criticism gained momentum largely because of megastar Taylor Swift’s public boycotting of the service.

We hear you @taylorswift13 and indie artists. Love, Apple

— Eddy Cue (@cue) June 22, 2015

#AppleMusic will pay artist for streaming, even during customer’s free trial period

— Eddy Cue (@cue) June 22, 2015

It’s also worth pointing out that the rapid response from the company, in addition to Taylor Swift’s subsequent decision to star in ads for Apple, has led many to believe that the entire confrontation was a PR stunt in the first place.

Either way, it worked. When Apple’s VP of software and services, Eddy Cue, tweeted out the company’s vow to reverse that policy, it garnered over 24,000 retweets and countless other tweets, posts, and think pieces about the incredible influence that one icon (and her squad) can wield on an entire industry. In fact, Cue’s tweets contained the phrase “we hear you” ‒ but neither the word “apologize” nor “sorry” ‒ true, inarguable proof that actions speak louder than words.

There’s no single formula that will create the perfect brand apology for every situation. Some, as we’ve seen, may call for a brand to offer no response at all. But those are few and far between. For the most part, brand apologies are a vital way for companies to regain public trust and loyalty after a public mishap. No matter what the infraction or how big the company, it’s always best to focus on those same three principles: sincerity, simplicity, and thoroughness.

Often, how a brand handles a crisis becomes the measure of its social reputation. That’s why you shouldn’t wait until all hell to break loose to get up to speed on the latest media intelligence tools and best practices for handling a crisis in the age of social media. Use our ebook, Media Intelligence for Crisis Communications to learn about setting up alerts, practicing smart media monitoring, and gathering real-time intel before trouble comes.

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This article originally appeared in Mainstreethost, was written by Mike Whitney from Business2Community, and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Social Sidekick 8/7-8/13

Please, sir, may I have S’mores Day? Even during the dog days of summer, there’s still plenty to Tweet about—the Rio Olympics, Hard Knocks: Training Camp (this year with the Los Angeles Rams) and the oft-neglected Middle Child Day. And maybe it’s just an old wives’ tale, but we hear that a National Apple Week a year keeps your content calendar in the clear. So read up and read ahead when you sign up to receive Sidekick straight to your inbox

Celebrate the Month of August

//HEALTH//
National Immunization Awareness Month

//FOOD//
Peach Month, Panini Month, Sandwich Month, Catfish Month

//FUN//
Romance Awareness Month

//SECOND WEEK OF AUGUST//
National Apple Week

Sunday, August 7

//HOLIDAYS//
Purple Heart Day, Sister’s Day, Friendship Day, Lighthouse Day, IPA Day, Psychic Day

//HASHTAGS//
#SundayFunday, #SelfieSunday, #Sinday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Charlize Theron, Sidney Crosby, David Duchvony, Samantha Ronson

//TV PREMIERES//
Inspector Lewis (9 PM PBS)

//SPORTS EVENTS//
Rio Olympics continue

Monday, August 8

//HOLIDAYS//
International Cat Day, Frozen Custard Day, Bowling Day, Zucchini Day, Frozen Custard Day, Victory Day (Rhode Island)

//HASHTAGS//
#ManCrushMonday or #MCM, #MondayBlues, #MotivationMonday, #MarketingMonday, #MeatlessMonday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Roger Federer, Dustin Hoffman, Princess Beatrice, The Edge (U2)

//TV PREMIERES//
The Rise of El Chapo (8 PM, History), Secret Eats with Adam Richman (10 PM, Travel)

Tuesday, August 9

//HOLIDAYS//
Rice Pudding Day, Book Lovers Day

//HASHTAGS//
#TransformationTuesday or #TT, #TravelTuesday, #ToungeOutTuesday, #Tunesday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Whitney Houston, Anna Kendrick, Michael Kors, Gillian Anderson, Melanie Griffith, Audrey Tautou  

//TV PREMIERES//
Botched by Nature (9 PM, E!), Hard Knocks: Training Camp with the Los Angeles Rams (10 PM, HBO)

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Wednesday, August 10

//HOLIDAYS//
World Lion Day, S’mores Day, Banana Split Day, Lazy Day, Skyscraper Appreciation Day, Duran Duran Appreciation Day

//HASHTAGS//
#WomanCrushWednesday or #WCW, #WayBackWednesday or #WBW, #WineWednesday, #WellnessWednesday, #HumpDay, #WisdomWednesday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Kylie Jenner, Suzanne Collins, Antonio Banderas, Angie Harmon, Herbert Hoover, Betsey Johnson

//TV PREMIERES//
Hollywood Medium with Tyler Hanley (8 PM, E!)

Thursday, August 11

//HOLIDAYS//
Son and Daughter Day, Play in the Sand Day, Ingersoll Day, Raspberry Tart Day

//HASHTAGS//
#TBT or #ThrowbackThursday, #Thursdate, #ThoughtfulThursday, #ThirstyThursday, #ThankfulThursday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Chris Hemsworth, Hulk Hogan, Viola Davis, Embeth Davidtz, Anna Gunn

//ALBUM RELEASES//
Of Montreal, “Innocence Reaches”; Atmosphere, “Fishing Blues”

Friday, August 12

//HOLIDAYS//
International Youth Day, Vinyl Record Day, Julienne Fries Day

//HASHTAGS//
#FollowFriday or #FF, #FlashbackFriday or #FBF, #FridayFeeling, #FriYay, #FridayReads

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Cara Delevingne, Casey Affleck, Francois Hollande

//MOVIE RELEASES//
Pete’s Dragon, Sausage Party, Florence Foster Jenkins

//TV RELEASES//
The Get Down (Netflix)

Saturday, August 13

//HOLIDAYS//
Middle Child Day, Garage Sale Day, Ecological Debt Day, International Left-Handed Day, Filet Mignon Day

//HASHTAGS//
#Caturday, #SexySaturday

//FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS//
Annie Oakley, Sebastian Stan

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