12 tech terms every PR professional should know

Since the turn of the century, the global tech sector has grown exponentially. In fact, it’s currently estimated to be worth more than $3 trillion and counting – making it one of the largest and fastest growing industries in the world.

Today, we rely on this industry every day. We use its products and services to share important information instantaneously, communicate with consumers through social media, and complete simple, mundane and often time-consuming tasks in the click of a button.

As a result, both our personal and professional lives have benefited greatly. We’re not only more productive, efficient, and capable, but we’re more aware of the market and our brand’s place in it.

However, the rate at which technology changes has also proven extremely challenging. Today, we’re forever trying to keep up with new devices, apps and solutions in order to take full advantage of their capabilities.

One of the best ways to fully appreciate technology and better understand the people who work to create, design and build it, is to familiarise ourselves with the language and terminology used by the industry. This is especially true for PR professionals whose communications strategies are becoming increasingly reliant on big data, social media and digital marketing.

To better your skills and make sense of tech’s behind-the-scene activity, familiarise yourself with the following 12 terms:

1. API

Application Programming Interface or API is the interface used to build web applications. In simple terms, it is the line of communication between two servers – making it easier for web systems to interact and developers to build solutions.

E.g. “We can monitor multiple social media channels through the custom-made dashboard, which displays various data transferred via API.”

2. Dark Social

Dark social is the social media activity that is not publicly available – often from private channels such as messenger apps, text messaging and emails. While it’s still social activity – people sharing ideas, opinions and information – it can’t be easily measured like public social media activity.

E.g. “We’ve measured our social media activity for the last month – excluding dark social – and the results show that consumers prefer video content over plain copy.”

3. Command Centre

A command centre is an area inside an organisation’s office space solely dedicated to social media use. These creative spaces are where employees, PR professionals and/or marketers go to monitor and engage in conversations with consumers.

E.g. “From the Command Centre, we can monitor sentiment and the progress of campaigns in real-time.”

4. Bounce Rate

Bounce rate is the percentage of users who only visit a webpage for a short amount of time – often not looking at or engaging with the content. Often, it is because these users have landed on a page that is not of interest to them.

E.g. “We need to post more meaningful and relevant content on our website to reduce our bounce rate.”

5. UGC

UGC or User Generated Content is social media content created by individuals not associated with the brand or enterprise. For example, when a customer writes a review about your business or service online and you choose to publish it on your Facebook page or Twitter feed.

E.g. “Our Facebook page received more views this week thanks to positive User Generated Content (UGC) on Twitter and Instagram.”

6. CRO

Conversion Rate Optimisation is a system used to calculate the percentage of website visitors who convert to paying customers. CRO is usually measured by asking webpage visitors to complete targeted actions such as joining a mailing list or typing a special code in at checkout to receive a discount.

E.g. “We used CRO to measure the results of our latest Instagram campaign.”

7. Keywords and page descriptions

Keywords are the common words and phrases used in search engines like Google and Bing to find relevant search results. Attaching keywords to your website’s pages will give it a greater chance of being found online.

E.g. “We need to use our website’s keywords across all social media platforms to strengthen SEO and drive web traffic.”

8. SEO

Search Engine Optimisation is used to increase a website’s visibility on a search engine’s unpaid results. Search engines like Google and Bing reward websites that align their content – from keywords to page headings and captioned images – increasing their likelihood of being listed in the first five to ten search results.

E.g. “We need to work on our SEO in order to appear on the first page of Google results. This will drive more consumers to our website.”

9. A/B testing

In web analytics, A/B testing is the comparison of two types of online content – such as two trial websites – in order to find out which one will perform better among consumers.

E.g. “We used A/B testing with a select group of consumers to find out what they’d like to see on our new website.”

10. UI and UX

User Interface refers to how a person interacts with a computer system or application such as 3D displays, website drop-down menus or touch screens. User Experience is how simple and enjoyable someone finds a particular piece of technology. The better the user experience, the more likely they are to use it again.

E.g. “UX and UI are inextricably linked because the best user experience is often frictionless, and is the result of considered UI design – offering users the information they want/need in the fewest clicks possible.”

11. AI and Machine Learning

Artificial intelligence is the development of computer systems to learn and perform tasks by simulating human intelligence – such as robots and chat-bots. Machine Learning is a computer’s ability to learn on its own – without being prompted by a human. It means computers can act on their own accord, learning from past experiences to make decisions.

E.g. “We’re going to use AI chat bots to respond to consumers on social media for our next campaign.”

12. Big Data

Big Data refers to large sets of unstructured data – data that requires sophisticated techniques and software  to uncover insights previously unavailable using traditional analytics. Big Data is used by marketers and PR professionals to measure the online behaviours of their target audience.

E.g. “We can use monitoring software like Meltwater to digest collections of big data in real-time.”

Knowing these key tech terms will prove invaluable to you and your PR team – especially at your next client consultation, IT workshop or board meeting.

About the author:

Mimrah Mahmood is the Asia-Pacific Regional Director of Media Solutions at Meltwater, where he helps numerous organisations break down media data (social, print and other), to create meaningful insights; build progressive and scientific frameworks to track efforts in PR and marketing; build road-maps to improve communications plans; and identify opportunities and threats that arise from competitors. As a leader within a multi-award winning company, Mimrah is a proud advocate of better measurement practices in PR, Brand and Strategic Communications. You can connect with Mimrah on LinkedIn https://sg.linkedin.com/in/mimrah

Want to find out how Meltwater can help deliver brand insights and competitive intelligence for your company? Click below!

Meltwater acquires leading social analytics company Sysomos

Acquisition expands Meltwater’s ability to incorporate online news and data with social media analytics in one robust platform

 

SINGAPORE, ASIA PACIFIC – April 24, 2018 – Meltwater, a pioneer of media intelligence and now Outside Insight, today announced its acquisition of Sysomos, a leader in social analytics and engagement. The addition of Sysomos to Meltwater enables organisations to analyse social media, news and other human-generated content in one platform, furthering Meltwater’s mission to give businesses the insights from outside data, helping them stay ahead.

“All the social analytics companies look at social data in isolation, limiting the insights for brands and businesses,” says Jorn Lyseggen, founder and CEO of Meltwater. “With our acquisition of Sysomos, we can bring together news and social media under one company, giving social data context while adding social engagement to our news and media monitoring offering.”

For the PR and communications teams who engage with influencers over social media, Meltwater’s existing Media Intelligence division will now offer integrated news monitoring and social engagement. Under Meltwater, Sysomos will become the Social Analytics division with a focus on delivering timely and relevant insights to brands and marketing teams. Both divisions support Meltwater’s mission to give businesses insights from external data.

“By joining the Meltwater team, our clients benefit from the leadership and global scale of one of the world’s first SaaS companies,” says Peter Heffring, the former Sysomos CEO who will run Meltwater’s Social Analytics division. “In order to enhance the search and analytics experience in the Sysomos Platform, we will leverage the AI models and information extracted from the unstructured web by Meltwater. This will give our clients the context needed to collect more meaningful insights across their earned and owned social channels.”

Following the acquisition of DataSift last month, the Sysomos acquisition cements Meltwater as the market leader of both Social Analytics and Media Intelligence. “It’s not enough to simply give clients raw data or shallow analytics – businesses need relevant insights. Between our combined data partnerships, Sysomos’ social analytics and Meltwater’s AI models, we can combine social and news data to extract game-changing insights for both of our clients,” says Niklas de Besche, Executive Director of Product at Meltwater. “At the same time, with Sysomos under the Meltwater brand, we can offer our clients greater integration between social engagement and media monitoring.”

The Sysomos acquisition is Meltwater’s seventh in the last 18 months.

About Meltwater
Meltwater, a pioneer of media intelligence and now Outside Insight, gives businesses the information advantage they need to stay ahead. More than 26,000 companies have used Meltwater’s media intelligence to stay on top of billions of online conversations and extract relevant insights to strategically manage their brands. With nearly 20 years of experience analyzing data, Meltwater is dedicated to personal, global service built on the local expertise of 55 offices across six continents. Meltwater is also committed to fostering the data science ecosystem through MEST, a pan-African entrepreneurial program and incubator, and Shack15, a global data science community. Learn more at Meltwater.com.

About Sysomos
Sysomos is the global leader in social marketing and analytics empowering brands and agencies to turn data-driven insights into actionable customer engagement opportunities. Our unified, insights-driven social platform gives marketers the easiest way to Search, Discover, Listen, Publish, Engage and Analyse at scale across earned, owned and paid media. Sysomos serves more than 1,200 customers including 80% of the world’s top agencies and global brands. Learn more at Sysomos.com.

Meltwater acquires leading social analytics company Sysomos

Acquisition expands Meltwater’s ability to incorporate online news and data with social media analytics in one robust platform

 

SINGAPORE, ASIA PACIFIC – April 24, 2018 – Meltwater, a pioneer of media intelligence and now Outside Insight, today announced its acquisition of Sysomos, a leader in social analytics and engagement. The addition of Sysomos to Meltwater enables organisations to analyse social media, news and other human-generated content in one platform, furthering Meltwater’s mission to give businesses the insights from outside data, helping them stay ahead.

“All the social analytics companies look at social data in isolation, limiting the insights for brands and businesses,” says Jorn Lyseggen, founder and CEO of Meltwater. “With our acquisition of Sysomos, we can bring together news and social media under one company, giving social data context while adding social engagement to our news and media monitoring offering.”

For the PR and communications teams who engage with influencers over social media, Meltwater’s existing Media Intelligence division will now offer integrated news monitoring and social engagement. Under Meltwater, Sysomos will become the Social Analytics division with a focus on delivering timely and relevant insights to brands and marketing teams. Both divisions support Meltwater’s mission to give businesses insights from external data.

“By joining the Meltwater team, our clients benefit from the leadership and global scale of one of the world’s first SaaS companies,” says Peter Heffring, the former Sysomos CEO who will run Meltwater’s Social Analytics division. “In order to enhance the search and analytics experience in the Sysomos Platform, we will leverage the AI models and information extracted from the unstructured web by Meltwater. This will give our clients the context needed to collect more meaningful insights across their earned and owned social channels.”

Following the acquisition of DataSift last month, the Sysomos acquisition cements Meltwater as the market leader of both Social Analytics and Media Intelligence. “It’s not enough to simply give clients raw data or shallow analytics – businesses need relevant insights. Between our combined data partnerships, Sysomos’ social analytics and Meltwater’s AI models, we can combine social and news data to extract game-changing insights for both of our clients,” says Niklas de Besche, Executive Director of Product at Meltwater. “At the same time, with Sysomos under the Meltwater brand, we can offer our clients greater integration between social engagement and media monitoring.”

The Sysomos acquisition is Meltwater’s seventh in the last 18 months.

About Meltwater
Meltwater, a pioneer of media intelligence and now Outside Insight, gives businesses the information advantage they need to stay ahead. More than 26,000 companies have used Meltwater’s media intelligence to stay on top of billions of online conversations and extract relevant insights to strategically manage their brands. With nearly 20 years of experience analyzing data, Meltwater is dedicated to personal, global service built on the local expertise of 55 offices across six continents. Meltwater is also committed to fostering the data science ecosystem through MEST, a pan-African entrepreneurial program and incubator, and Shack15, a global data science community. Learn more at Meltwater.com.

About Sysomos
Sysomos is the global leader in social marketing and analytics empowering brands and agencies to turn data-driven insights into actionable customer engagement opportunities. Our unified, insights-driven social platform gives marketers the easiest way to Search, Discover, Listen, Publish, Engage and Analyse at scale across earned, owned and paid media. Sysomos serves more than 1,200 customers including 80% of the world’s top agencies and global brands. Learn more at Sysomos.com.

How to Engage with Journalists on Social Media

Ten years ago, before media databases and Google-able phone numbers, the hardest task of any PR campaign was tracking down journalists’ contact details. Whether you had access to the infamous News Media Yellow Book or tried to MacGyver your way to a phone number, it was both a time-consuming and headache-inducing process.

Now, the tricky part isn’t tracking down journalists’ latest newsroom extensions. It’s figuring out when and how to engage with them in a way that’s professional, effective, and personalized to each one—especially when it comes to social media.

If you’re still wrapping your head around how to interact with journalists online, here are three questions to help guide an outreach strategy and bullet points to help you engage with journalists on social media.

1. Who is using social media?

First, pull out your trusty (and most updated!) media list and, line-by-line, figure out who of your top journalists are using social media and which platforms they’re using. (P.S.: Meltwater’s database search function makes this a breeze.)

2. Are they using social media regularly?

For those that are using social media, are they posting daily? Several times a week? If so, you’re in business. If not, stick to email. You don’t want to risk your messages being overlooked because they simply aren’t seeing them.

3. How do they interact with PR professionals and/or brands (if at all)?

This might take a little digging into their feed, but here’s what you want to get a feel for: Are they asking for sources or quotes on their platforms? Are they responding to pitches directly? Are they interacting regularly with PR people and brands? Are they telling those people to direct message them or are they having public conversations? Or are they simply linking to their own stories and not engaging at all?

This will help shape how you approach engaging with each journalist on their most active platform—whether you’re casually nurturing a relationship through sharing and commenting on their content or plan to use Facebook or Twitter as your primary pitching platform.

Once you’ve got your short-list, here are our top do’s and don’ts for engaging with journalists on social media:

DO

  • Reach out through a personal account. Just like you prefer interacting with humans—instead of generic email addresses and branded Twitter accounts—so do journalists. It’s also easier to nurture an ongoing relationship when they can put a face to a name.

  • Still include a hook! In the same way that you’d look for a compelling hook when sending an email, you want to give the same thoughtfulness to your tweet, Facebook post or Instagram DM. Have something interesting to say about something they just posted? That’s a great place to start.

  • Ask for their outreach preferences. When they respond, direct message them and ask “I contacted you on Twitter; is that the best place to reach out to you?” That’ll help you figure out your most direct line to them moving forward.

DON’T

  • Stalk. Meaning, it’s not necessary to like every tweet, photo, or post. Rule of thumb: If it would creep you out, it’ll likely creep them out too.

  • Join online journalist communities and/or events in the hopes of pitching your stuff. It’s absolutely fine (and encouraged!) to tune into a journalist-focused event (like the weekly #wjchat Twitter chat) to better understand them, how they work and what they’re paying attention to. But don’t show up and try to pitch your latest product or arrange for a coffee. It’ll feel inappropriate and out of context—and do way more harm than good.

  • Go straight for the pitch. Unless it’s a crisis and you need to get in touch with them ASAP, follow them, say hello, and like and share the content you find most compelling and relevant before you start asking them to write stories about you. (If you were on the other side of that screen, you’d want them to do the same).

Wondering where to start?

Check out the mastheads of media outlets that you like, make note of the writers. When you find yourself enjoying an article, make a note of the byline. Check out other articles that the journalists you like may have penned and which other outlets they’re writing for. Look for them on Twitter and start following them. After a few rounds of this, you’ll amass a list of journalists that you’re tracking. If you want to quickly expand that list, use a media database.